framework

After the WordPress workshops over the past few days, I came across a post about the new PageLines 2.2 update and noticed some interesting points that I thought worth sharing. If you attended, you probably gathered I’m a fan of theme frameworks (including PageLines) – maybe too much for the purists ūüėČ

Choosing a theme is purely based on preference and it really does depend on how much flexibility/functionality you want out of the box and how much you want to get your hands dirty.

The main reason I’m posting this is that during a quick chat after the workshop, the topic soon turned to the brilliant Twitter Bootstrap. Twitter Bootstrap is a library of common web components (layout options, formatting, forms, buttons etc.) to make web design and development easier and way more consistent. If you’re into web development, I highly recommend looking at Twitter Bootstrap. If you’re already using Twitter Bootstrap, take a look at the awesome¬†Bootswatch, a really easy way to change the default Bootstrap look and feel by dropping in a custom CSS file (referred to as Bootstrap themes).

Update: I’ve just stumbled across a marketplace for Bootstap themes called¬†WrapBootstrap.

Ok, so how does this relate to WordPress? Well, one of the new key features PageLines 2.2 is it’s use of Twitter Bootstrap. You can read all about the update and watch a quick video demo. Even if PageLines isn’t your theme framework of choice, it’s clear things are heading in this direction. I’ve used PageLines in the past and with this update, I’m definitely revisiting it for a closer looks at this update.

You can read more about the PageLines framework 2.2 here.

We’d love to hear if there’s a particular theme or theme framework that you really love, just hit us up at @wpsupportau and we’ll make sure to mention it at our workshops.